‘TEST-TO-STAY’ IN SCHOOL, THE NEW COVID RULE

Listen to Article

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday moved to update its guidance for elementary schools to allow them to implement a “test-to-stay” strategy that employs frequent testing when students were exposed to COVID-19.

“Test-to-stay is an encouraging public-health practice to keep our children in school,” Rochelle Walensky, the C.D.C. director, said, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The C.D.C. said that frequent testing of children who were exposed to the virus could be an effective tool—when combined with other safety precautions like wearing face masks—and help keep students at their desks. The report said that under the plan, students exposed to someone with COVID will essentially undergo daily testing. One of the main issues is that the method could be costly for schools with fewer resources.

The C.D.C.'s official guidance has been that when someone in a school tests positive, those in close contact should stay out of the school for 10 days. The agency revised its guidance and said both test-to-stay programs and quarantining approaches are equally good options.

TREND FORECAST: The Trends Journal has reported extensively on lockdowns and the impact they have on school-aged children. (See: “LOCKDOWN MADNESS: CURE WORSE THAN THE DISEASE,” “SCHOOL LOCKDOWNS KILLING STUDENTS,” and “DETROIT SCHOOLS: MAJORITY OF KIDS ABSENT. CLASSES GOING ONLINE.”)

The magazine has pointed out that the lockdowns in 2020 helped speed up the transition to online learning, which is here to stay. (See: “MEGA-TREND OF THE FUTURE: RICE UNIVERSITY TURNS TO ONLINE LEARNING,” “INDIA’S ONLINE-LEARNING AN INVESTMENT WINDFALL, SOLIDIFYING ‘INTERACTIVE U’ FORECAST IN TRENDS JOURNAL.”)

With interactive education, students will be able to access the best and most accomplished experts in selected fields of study rather than the one-size-fits-all, outdated educational programming that is now the norm.

Trends are born, they grow, mature, reach old age, and die. The Industrial Age education model is dying, and the “Interactive U” model Gerald Celente had forecast in his bestselling book, “Trends 2000” (Warner Books, 1997), is still in its infancy.

Thus, the Ontrendpreneur® opportunities that seize upon its growth will provide great rewards.


Support the Trends Journal with these great products


1 Comment
  1. malvarez 9 months ago

    The trend of online education is alive and slowing thriving. During cyber monday, udemy.com was offering deep discounts on its online courses. The prices i saw during this day made community college prices way to expensive.

Leave a reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

©2022 The Trends Journal

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?