10. BRICK-AND-MORTAR BOUNCE

In 2018, while online shopping will grow bigger, smart brick-and-mortar retailers will grow stronger.

The dramatic decline of shopping malls is often blamed on the rise of online shopping. There is no doubt about it. Digital retail has taken a big bite out of brick-and-mortar shopping, especially for malls.

However, we identified other more powerful underlying trends that contributed to the death of many malls that the media and retail industry either can’t see, won’t admit to or are afraid to, because they fear losing advertisers. And, it’s their lack of future vision that blinds them to the new "Brick-and-Mortar Bounce" trend.

For decades, Gerald Celente wrote about it. In his book, Trends 2000 in 1996, he predicted the “Pall on the Malls,” noting there was a gross overdevelopment of malls and shopping centers.

Simultaneously, America’s once thriving middle class was shrinking, thus there was a declining population of enough people with enough money to “shop until we drop.”

During the hey-day of retail growth, the already retail Bigs became retail Giants through mergers and acquisitions. Burdened with massive debt and focused on building their bottom line, they built a homogenous retail landscape based on sterile data-driven corporate models of shopping patterns and buying habits that replaced original, unique product development.

Rather than providing consumers with diverse and original products that can only be designed with creative artistic freedom, they focused on a one-size-fits-all corporate strategy.

Today, sameness rules. Been to a mall lately? If you’ve been to one, essentially, you’ve been to them all.

And have you been to one of Walmart’s 11,700 retail stores? Not only is each the same, long forgotten are the tens of thousands of small, unique and community-minded brick and mortar mom-and-pops the Walmart clan killed.

The Bigs have taken the joy out of shopping, and inventive, creative Brick and Mortar OnTrendpreneurs® - especially those in "Organic Growth Cities" - now have the wide open field of opportunity to fill the product, service, customer experience shopping gaps they’ve left behind.

No, brick-and-mortar isn’t dead. Even the online giants Amazon and Alibaba are buying them up.

TREND FORECAST: Brick-and-mortar businesses, emphasizing quality and value delivered with a human touch, will grow stronger in 2018 and own a bigger piece of the retail market-share pie.

While struggling retail chains close brick-and-mortar stores at a record pace, mom-and-pop businesses on Main Street, and in particular in "Organic Growth Cities," will thrive.

The Bigs killed the style in shopping. New generations of consumers, especially millennials, crave a genuine shopping experience that speaks to them and the OnTrendpreneurs® that hear what they want and develop the business models to meet their needs will thrive. 

Comments

Submitted by Piper Pilot on Tue, 12/12/2017 - 13:39 Permalink
The reality is the Bezos "hit a home run" and has changed retail forever. His software is incredible, and the range of products is also mind boggling. You click, and a UPS guy shows up in a uniform, and hands you your package in two days from "clicking." No gas consumed, shipping included, no wasted time, no ignorant clerks, and pricing that is consistently better than the stores and often no sales tax. Plus Kindle books, Prime movies and documentation on everything purchased. Returns are no problem. Print out a label and the UPS guy takes it back. I can't imagine how a "creative" store will provide product and service that will allow them to make a profit (the only reason to have a business.) I hope you are correct, but the toothpaste is out of the tube, and "brick and mortar" stores will have to have a better "customer experience" that provides value. To me, Amazon stunned Walmart, and keeps them honest, which was not the case when Bezos was just starting out. I hope you are correct, and we will see what happens next.
Submitted by Julius Paul on Tue, 01/30/2018 - 16:00 Permalink
Trendy neighborhood retail strips (of individual stores) doing well in many places throughout USA and Canada are proof to your theory that there is a market for it! Millennials crave this experience, that 'they' will have to create. I agree, 100%, that it can happen. The prediction is 100% reality if millennials get off their lazy asses, use some imagination, and most importantly not give up (or become stuck in a comfort zone) when obstacles show up in their new business. The latter being the most difficult, because low self-esteem is a huge potential to curb them, along with Mom and Dad to fall back on. One more thing: individuality of stores is not enough. There needs to be a revival of entire neighborhood retail strips, or at least an entire block, of these individual stores creating a magnet for people to arrive, with clean modern city infrastructure and decent parking space and access. When I was a young teenager, I used to question why the two biggest record stores in Toronto were side-by-side on the famous retail strip known as Yonge Street. Eventually I figured it out on my own: They thrived off each other to bring all the people from the city, including the suburbs, to come down for the shopping experience of two unique stores offering the biggest selection available. Yes they were competing, but together they created a magnet of shoppers large enough to make both stores extremely successful!
Submitted by Julius Paul on Tue, 01/30/2018 - 16:00 Permalink
Trendy neighborhood retail strips (of individual stores) doing well in many places throughout USA and Canada are proof to your theory that there is a market for it! Millennials crave this experience, that 'they' will have to create. I agree, 100%, that it can happen. The prediction is 100% reality if millennials get off their lazy asses, use some imagination, and most importantly not give up (or become stuck in a comfort zone) when obstacles show up in their new business. The latter being the most difficult, because low self-esteem is a huge potential to curb them, along with Mom and Dad to fall back on. One more thing: individuality of stores is not enough. There needs to be a revival of entire neighborhood retail strips, or at least an entire block, of these individual stores creating a magnet for people to arrive, with clean modern city infrastructure and decent parking space and access. When I was a young teenager, I used to question why the two biggest record stores in Toronto were side-by-side on the famous retail strip known as Yonge Street. Eventually I figured it out on my own: They thrived off each other to bring all the people from the city, including the suburbs, to come down for the shopping experience of two unique stores offering the biggest selection available. Yes they were competing, but together they created a magnet of shoppers large enough to make both stores extremely successful!