Special Report

Posted 2/6/12

A Trends Journal Exclusive

(click here for Special Report)

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After Japan’s Fukushima nuclear catastrophe, the reaction was immediate: Germany shuttered its seven oldest nuclear-powered electric …

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Special Report

Posted
A Trends Journal Exclusive (click here for Special Report)
Dear Subscriber, After Japan’s Fukushima nuclear catastrophe, the reaction was immediate: Germany shuttered its seven oldest nuclear-powered electric generating plants and announced that the rest would be closed by 2022. Switzerland abandoned plans to build three new nuclear plants and decided not to extend the lives of their current five. France and other countries too dependent on uranium-fired generators to give them up mandated stringent safety reviews and improvements. This past November, French Socialist presidential hopeful Francois Hollande made nuclear power a hot button issue by promising, if elected in May, he would shut down 24 nuclear reactors by 2025. But, even after the object lesson of Fukushima, the global use of nuclear power will continue to grow. China and India haven’t swerved from their plans to build reactors for decades to come. Even in the U.S., where nuclear generating plants face years of regulatory review and political protest, companies are moving ahead with designs for a new generation of small, portable nuclear reactors. The issue isn’t that we’re using the wrong form of power. In our exclusive Special Report (click here to access), Ben Daviss, our Science Contributing Editor, makes the case that industry has just made a poor choice of fuel. Substituting thorium – an obscure, abundant, mildly radioactive element – in place of uranium can make nuclear power a cleaner, safer (though not trouble-free) alternative to fossil fuels. Now thorium’s champions are beginning to make themselves heard, and you’re hearing it from the Trends Journal. Sincerely, Gerald Celente P.S. To keep on top of the Trends and ahead of the news, be sure to tune into Gerald Celente's bi-weekly Trends In The News. Every Tuesday and Thursday, news and views you won't find anywhere else.
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