Middle East meltdown not making news

Posted 6/10/15

Do you remember the USS Cole, the Navy guided-missile destroyer nearly destroyed in October 2000 by a terrorist bomb that killed 17 sailors and injured 39 while refueling in the Yemeni port of Aden?

I remember it well for two reasons. In the Trends Journal and Trends 2000 (Warner Books, 1997) I had forecast the new …

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Middle East meltdown not making news

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TRENDS THIS WEEK:
Middle East meltdown not making news


By Gerald Celente
Trends Journal publisher
10 June 2015

Do you remember the USS Cole, the Navy guided-missile destroyer nearly destroyed in October 2000 by a terrorist bomb that killed 17 sailors and injured 39 while refueling in the Yemeni port of Aden?

I remember it well for two reasons. In the Trends Journal and Trends 2000 (Warner Books, 1997) I had forecast the new millennium would be marked by increased terror strikes against US targets at home and abroad – all in response to Washington’s foreign policy. And, just one month after the attack, I was the keynote speaker at a Virginia Military Institute symposium to address the “Top Trends of the 21st Century” and their effects in the decades ahead. A few days before I arrived, I was asked to join Gen. Anthony Zinni for lunch. It was Zinni who had told the Senate Armed Services Committee two weeks earlier that refueling the Cole in Aden was his decision.

Now, nearly 15 years later, Aden and Yemen are back in the news, but barely. Buried on the back pages of the few major newspapers and all but banished from a broadcast media transfixed on a transgender, a sports scandal and celebrity sexcapades, was coverage of the massacre of thousands of innocent Yemini civilians and the extensive destruction of the poorest nation in the Middle East by Saudi Arabia, one the richest.

Saudi justification for launching the war against a sovereign nation – that was neither a threat nor belligerent – was to restore Yemini President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, who had resigned from office in January following an uprising by Houthi rebels. Hadi, vice president since 1994, replaced President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who ruled for three decades and was forced from office during the 2011 Arab Spring. 

Now, after three months of Saudi bombings, as we had forecast, Houthis are launching counterattacks against Saudi military and oil installations.

Should the war dramatically escalate into Saudi Arabia, it may well prove to be the spark that ignites the entire Middle East. Beyond the terrible human tragedy, destabilized rich Arab nations engulfed in civil and regional wars will spread panic to already volatile equity markets.

Just as the bombing of the Cole was a precursor – whether by accident or design – to 9/11, the war against Yemen launched by Saudi Arabia, its Arab coalition and Washington is a precursor to a Middle East terror of 9/11 magnitude – and beyond.

©MMXV The Trends Research Institute®